Friday, July 29, 2011

Here's to "The Little Woman"

Okay, first the sob story:

This week's INFF was done in-person, which isn't a big deal, it just means I have to type up the interview from my meticulous handwritten notes. This takes time. I ran out of time. Time's up. Time flies. All that jazz.

As my peace offering, I submit the following bit of film magic. Created in 1940, this magnificent short film does the seemingly impossible: praise women for all the work they do while managing to repeatedly belittle them. The script and the narrator's tone of voice are so ridiculously condescending. The basic summary: "Look at all the neat-o things the dames do during their cute little days. It's too bad they are so frail and weak. Good thing we men invented important things to make their days easier!" Personally, I thought it was hilarious.

Enjoy (and don't take it too seriously ladies, or this will ruin your day -AND- if your husband/father/boyfriend isn't a neanderthal, be amazed by that, because obviously men have come a long way in only 70 years):


8 comments:

Katie Dodge said...

Oh my gravy! I'm feeling a little lazy after seeing all that I, as a little woman, should be doing every day! That was too funny! :)

Dianna Zaragoza said...

My grandmother used to say that it was a mistake for women to want to be like men - because that would be a step backward for the women!

Women back then weren't blind to the way men were treating them, and it took a lot of courage to step up and make men realize that "weak" and "dainty" were dirty words when it came to the ladyfolk.

Robin Weeks said...

Wow. Just wow.

So I learned that:
1) Women aren't weak, look at all the work they do!
2) Good men should invent things to help the women with their work, because, as we all know, women are weaker than men and shouldn't work so hard.
3) Men are so great, helping women with their work like that--why, they should continue to invent things until women don't even have to lift one of their dainty little fingers since, obviously, powdering their faces is much too much physical labor.

Sigh.

I'm still trying to get my husband to quit telling my boys to "stop crying / squealing / throwing / whining" like a girl." Or to agree to let me try for a girl, so I can tell her to stop crying / squealing / throwing / whining like a boy. No, that's not a double standard. It's payback.

Monica said...

Bwahahaha!!! The ironic thing is that those women were doing their husbands' jobs and more less than two years later. Also, I feel a little underdressed for my womanly duties. Apparently, I should be wearing heals.....

Donna K. Weaver said...

Oh, my gosh. It made me think of that song from the musical "Hello Dolly" where they sing about "It Takes a Woman" and finally admits "a husky woman" to do everything.

Sarah M Eden said...

Testify, Monica! I had to laugh thinking that those "weak" "frail" "clinging vines" (clinging vines was my favorite vaguely insulting term for women used in the film) would be the Rosie the Riveters of the coming decade.

Karen Adair said...

My favorite story to tell is when my husband's co-worker asked him if his wife worked, to which my husband replied, "Dang harder than I do!" It's no wonder we've been married 21 years. :)

Annette Lyon said...

I am ill after watching it. That is all.

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